Dairy mis-leaders call for unity, bring on misery

By Sherry Bunting, Farmshine Op-Ed, July 19, 2019

Dairy producers find joy in the big and little things in life on the farm, working with family, raising children on the farm, building or continuing a family business, seeing the sun rise and set as they work, producing wholesome milk they take pride in, helping a cow have her calf, watching that calf grow and develop, planting tiny seeds, watching a crop grow.

We know personal stress on farms is at an all-time high, amid price and weather pressures. There is some optimism returning as last month’s milk checks were a bit better, and the futures markets fueled some optimism before hitting the see-saw again. Also, the first round of dairy margin coverage (DMC) checks have been received or are in the mail. (Signups for 2019 DMC end Sept. 20).

But despite the return of some optimism, stress continues to build on our dairy farms because the hole that has been dug is so deep, the ground to make up so vast, and the future sustainability of family farm businesses more challenged by the industry’s control of how they operate.

My thoughts here are based on personal meetings, phone conferences, emails and other communications with young farm families operating small herds and multi-family operations with very large herds. 

In my various work and volunteer efforts as a freelancer — I visit a lot of dairy farms. 

Even though milk prices are gradually rising, net mailbox prices are flat and costs are going up, eating into the price gains. Forages are tight, weather is an added burden, farmers are utilizing new strategies, adopting progressive practices, improving their business management – and yet, their farms and families are fraying over the question of whether to stay the course or sell the cows and leave it behind. 

Many are taking on other work and adding to their already long days with efforts to bring in income to support the farm.

Communities are feeling the long fingers, and farmers and related agribusinesses are supporting each other as best they are able. The levels of farm community unity have probably never been higher in this regard: People are coming together to promote milk through voluntary efforts, to support their neighbors, and to reach out to each other as friends and colleagues.

The industry leaders say the dairy industry must be unified. They say it is wrong to challenge the path of the industry because doing so is “depressing and divisive” and “brings more stress onto the farmers.”

Don’t challenge the system, they say, because this creates negativity and stress when farmers need to stay positive and united. This, I’ve been told by leaders.

Questions and challenges are not meant to divide or stress our farmers. The stress is already there. It may not always be spoken, but it is there, and it is visible. 

This stress cannot be painted over with pretty colors.

Stress on dairy farms today is rooted in the way this industry and various milk pricing and nutrition policies have economically failed our farmers (and our consumers), especially since 2008.

To talk about the industry’s path — to discuss and debate marketing decisions made with producer dollars — does not mean one is being divisive. This is America where ideas and challenges can still be discussed and debated, and where leaders can be questioned and held accountable.

How much more divided can an industry become than to see marriages, families, businesses, dreams fractured from the undue stress of not only a tough deal on the milk pricing but perhaps even more concerning, the increased levels of control that this same system puts upon our farmers, and how they manage their farms, as a condition to keep their milk contracts?

This loss of independence and loss of their ability to control the ‘controllables’ is of utmost concern. If we ignore these trends — in an attempt to be passively non-divisive — does that make the issue or problem go away? Certainly not.

Rapid streamlining of the dairy industry is underway, at least in part because this is the path charted in 2008 by the DMI Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy and the U.S. Dairy Export Council working via memorandums of understanding with USDA Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack who is today a DMI leader as USDEC president and CEO and instrumental in the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy. 

Both USDEC and the Innovation Center are primarily supported by the mandatory checkoff paid by dairy farmers; but they also partner with food supply chain companies that work on proprietary products, ideas and concepts for the expressed purpose of growing the dairy sector globally.

The industry leaders tasked with spending the farmer’s 15 cents per hundredweight say raising exports to 20% (last year was 16%) is the key for a growing dairy industry.

Most notably, Vilsack reported in May that, “2018 was a record year for U.S. dairy exporters with export volume up 10% from the prior year. Simply put, exports support the growth aspirations of the U.S. dairy sector.”

Nowhere in his statement, or the entire blog post at USDEC, did Vilsack mention the dairy farmers who pay his salary. He mentions the dairy exporters and the dairy sector, but not the dairy producers.

Are exporters and sectors paying his salary of $750,000? No, not really. A small portion of USDEC is funded by ‘industry’ memberships, and importers pay a smaller checkoff, but the bulk of the agency and its CEO Tom Vilsack are funded directly from government-mandated dairy producer checkoff funds.

Where are the statements about a promotion agenda that seeks to return a fair price and livable income to those producers paying the agenda-makers salaries?

At various meetings last year where milk markets were discussed, dairy traders stated that exports do not raise farm-level milk prices. Interestingly, 2018 exports were higher than 2017 while 2018 prices paid to dairy farmers were much lower than 2017.

The direction of the dairy checkoff is toward growth of the dairy sector globally, at all costs, and yet the U.S. dairy farmers are paying the bill for this, with USDA having very close control of it.

This goal has been positioned to farmers as an all-out race to gain global market share before other countries do it, without a methodical approach or review on the impact to domestic markets and producers along the way.

This global agenda is also steering the sustainability frameworks and alliances DMI’s Innovation Center is forming that will control more aspects of management at the farm level in the future.

In recent proof of conversations between farmers and checkoff staff and board members, questions about Innovation Center projects, alliances and partnerships were passed off as though the board receives its information on these projects on a “need to know” basis. A board member stated in these exchanges that they are not concerned with seeing every detail of a proprietary project because DMI’s attorneys and USDA’s attorneys know the details, and the board trusts the staff.

(I have served on boards elected by citizens. Trust in staff is critical, but so is transparency of projects paid for by a checkoff — the same as a school tax.)

For some, a call for unity means don’t ask questions. For others, it means get informed and start mobilizing a grassroots unifying effort.

In a copy of non-executive February DMI board minutes received by Farmshine, a strategy is detailed by the Farmer Relations and Consumer Confidence Committee. According to the minutes, a key discussion at the February 19-21 board meeting was stated as “farmer engagement around checkoff value is more important than ever before.”

A key bullet point was for national and local checkoff board members to “focus on the movable middle.”

Another bullet point of the discussion in the minutes is that DMI is “learning from the checkoff Facebook page and regional media coverage (Farmshine) reinforcing that you do NOT continue to engage with those detractors that cannot/will not be moved.”

While Farmshine was still seeking answers to questions and had not yet published the DMI chair’s letter of response (published Feb. 21), DMI had already taken a position in its Feb. 20 board discussion to “not engage” with detractors, mentioning Farmshine parenthetically by name in this category.

According to the minutes, the rest of the DMI board discussion on this topic centered on the need to “reach out to those farmers who see/hear from the unmovable detractors” (that would mean Farmshine readers as per the above). According to the minutes, “ways to reach the movable middle” were discussed.

So, while organizations chart a course for unity and reaching out to a movable middle, dairy farm families are focused on finding ways to move forward on their farms and to unify and inform their communities.

Even though our legislators are taking notice of the growing crisis — and some sincerely care and are trying to do something — these stopgaps and investments are a drop in a very large bucket. Those drops are appreciated, but there are big things to tackle that require courage when it comes to the needed changes in nutrition rules, checkoff rules, promotion rules, labeling rules (and also lack of standard of identity enforcement), complex milk pricing rules (while processors and co-ops are readying a proposal for their make allowance increases as soon as prices improve a bit), not to mention rules that impact the cost of doing business every day on the farm.

As dairy farm families keep moving forward, finding ways to do more with less, working longer hours with less help, taking on off-farm employment and finding other revenue streams to pay their bills — They are consequently burning the candle at both ends and incurring more stress.

The stress on farms of all sizes can be overwhelming and is felt by even the best operators.

We do need unity, yes, but the question farmers are asking themselves is: Who will be part of dairy’s unified and globalized future? They deserve to know the direction the organizations they fund are taking their product, their market, and the industry they have supplied with wholesome milk for generations.

We can do better than this in America where agriculture truly is our backbone. Without strong farm families, all else fails eventually, including our liberty and security as a nation. 

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Genetics firm gets ‘Dynamite’ boost

PA-based upstart has world’s only son of Co-Vale Dempsey Dina 4270-ET EX96

By Sherry Bunting, Farmshine, July 12, 2019

LEBANON, Pa. — Genetics is the multifaceted red-hot topic with nuances that vary across the spectrum of dairies, from small to large, breeder to commercial — and everything in between. It’s objective and subjective. Art and science. Logic and passion. Fact and opinion. All rolled up into one subject that can keep you talking for hours, if not days.

What cuts across all, is managing progress — finding ways to move a herd forward in an environment of rapid change in the face of economic constraints.

For Kendra Nagle, with the help of her righthand man Brandon DeLong, and her father Ken Reist, Top Notch Genetics LLC is that labor of love.

Collaborating with her father Ken Reist and righthand man in bull research and selection Brandon DeLong, Kendra Nagle is bullish on dairy herd progress. They launched Top Notch Genetics, LLC in March 2018. Photo by Rhoda Reist

“Our goal is to keep the dairy farmer moving forward in their genetic progress,” says Kendra, about the genetics company based from her home in Lebanon, Pennsylvania and launched March 1, 2018 — two years after starting Got Embryos.

Friday’s ‘Dynamite’ release has ignited some bullishness, and there’s more to come.

“The most exciting thing yet is Dynamite from Bob Landis. He’s by Kenosha out of the famous Dina,” Kendra reports. “We are super excited to get him out there and get people using him and hope to see babies in the next nine to 12 months. We’re excited to see how they look.”

Bob Landis of Landis Marketing and Landis-MRK Holsteins already knows how Dina’s daughters look, he’s working with many of them already.

“We’re convinced Dynamite will make pretty show babies,” says an obviously excited Kendra.

Top Notch owns bulls, leases bulls and partners on bulls. Their catalog is growing, and they offer some services that put eyes on cattle — not just the numbers and pedigrees — with linear scoring for matings based on what is, not what should be. They even help farms better utilize what’s already in their own inventory.

Co-Vale Dempsey Dina 4270-ET EX96 pictured after being named grand champion of the 2017 Canadian Royal Agricultural Winter Fair. Dina has fans around the world, but her biggest fans may be the ones in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. Dynamite is her only son, worldwide, and he is available through Top Notch Genetics. Photo submitted

And they are handling bulls from all over. The bulls are housed and collected at two locations in California, and Brandon, who lives in Lebanon and hails from a dairy farm in Michigan, travels to the Midwest every other week, north once a month and throughout the Mid-Atlantic on the days in between.

“Brandon finds the bulls, he does the research, talks to the farmers, sets up the leases. He is an encyclopedia of cattle, especially in the show world — knowing sires, daughters, families. He knows it inside and out,” Kendra relates.

Recently, two representatives in Lancaster County have been added — James Mast, Morgantown, and Joe Wivell, Columbia — just in time for Dynamite.

Jordan Zimmerman of Misty Z Holsteins, East Earl, Pa. was the first to light that fuse, and others in Lancaster County are also getting in. It’s not every day that the son of an internationally-renown cow with some local heritage is offered, available and approachable for everyone. 

In addition to Dina’s ‘cool local story,’ her fans are worldwide with international interest coming in for the only son in the world by three-time All American Co-Vale Dempsey Dina 4270-ET EX96. 

Brandon DeLong (right) of Top Notch Genetics congratulates Jordan (left) and Dale Zimmerman as the first to purchase straws of Dynamite to light the Dina fuse at Misty Z Holsteins, East Earl, Pa. Photo submitted

Dina made her mark on the international stage in 2017, when she was reserve grand champion of the International Holstein Show at World Dairy Expo and grand champion Holstein of the Canadian Royal Agricultural Fair. That year she was also unanimous All-Canadian and All-American 4-year-old.

She came back last fall as first place 5-year-old, best udder and best production cow of a very large and competitive International Holstein Show at the 2018 World Dairy Expo.

And in January of this year, Dina was upgraded to EX-96, after unanimous consideration from multiple Holstein USA classifiers.

Since 2017, Dina has been co-owned and exhibited by Milksource of Kaukauna, Wisconsin, where she lives today and was visited by the Pennsylvania delegation during the National Holstein convention in the Dairyland State in June. Ransom Rail, Perry, New York is also a co-owner.

But her story has a twist for the locals who have followed her for all of her five years. Whether in the showring or attending cattle auctions and Holstein events, Lancaster Countians had a front-row seat for Dina’s development as the 4-H show calf of Bob’s granddaughter Olivia Gold.

Born in Preble, New York and bred by the Cates family of Co-Vale Holsteins, the Ex-96 black beauty’s story started here when Bob and his granddaughter purchased Dina as a calf at a GTPI Type Sale in 2013.

When she calved in 2014, Bob reports that he and Olivia sold half-interest to the Dueppengiessers of Ransom Rail. Nominated fall yearling in milk that year, she went on to be undefeated at World Dairy Expo in Madison and at the Royal in 2015. By July of 2017, Bob had sold his half to Milksource at the Radiance of Ransom Rail.

Dynamite will be pictured this fall, and Kendra says he’s tall, strong and deep with “a great foot and leg score and great udder traits.” What also makes him special is as a cross with no Doorman in his pedigree.

“We were thrilled when Bob called and asked if we would be interested in carrying him,” Kendra recalls. “He’s the only Dina son in the world right now being collected and available for everyone.”

For Kendra, it’s all about relationships and access. She built an international network through Got Embryos, and that’s how she met Brandon. “We launched the genetics business, started the catalog, kept collecting and growing and hitting the pavement,” she says. “We’ve been through four proofs since we started, and are streamlining, getting better genetics and seeing opportunities open up.”

The bullishness continues. Kendra reports another Lancaster County bull from Bob Landis will debut this week.

“Denali has a cool story too,” she says. He carries Bob’s prefix, but Gary Martin is his owner with Bob and Top Notch buying-in for collection.

Bob had Denali’s dam at the Martin farm for calving, and when she had a bull calf, Bob said ‘keep him’ as toward payment. Gary is a smart 17-year-old. 

“He liked the pedigree and saw some interesting things behind the little bull calf, so before making any decisions he got Denali genomic-tested, and he came back +4.06 for Type,” Kendra recounts. “He called Bob and said, ‘so, I’ve got this thing to tell you.’ Bob was surprised and called us right away to see if we would be interested in carrying this Crush son. His dam is a Byway out of Gold Chip Dina and out of Gold Deb EX-95.”

In addition to Dynamite and Denali from Landis-MRK, Top Notch is working with bulls from Luck-E and others in the Midwest, and Waddell, Penn England, Tom Mercuro, Ladys Manor, and Cool Lawn, just for example in the East. The bulls they are collecting span from Pennsylvania, New York, New England and Virginia to Ohio, Wisconsin, Iowa, Washington and even Canada.

Kendra Nagle connects with Matt Engel of Luck-E Holsteins, Hampshire, Illinois about bull prospects at World Dairy Expo. Engel has Luck-E’s Keona-Red (and Polled) son of Kandie in the Top Notch lineup.  Photo submitted

On the sales side, internationally, they’ve worked with herds in Mexico, Brazil, Australia, Peru and the Middle East and are working on Europe and Canada.

 “We don’t sleep, especially when proofs come out,” Kendra confesses.

She’s driven by wanting to help dairy farmers get the genetics that best fit their herds, even as she, herself, has been searching for her ‘fit’ since 2011, when the cows on her parents’ farm were sold.

Kendra is understandably proud of the conception rates they are seeing above the average by 4 to 15%. “We listen to farmers, do our research, work out of my home, and try to keep prices affordable so farmers can use higher net merit and GTPI bulls,” she explains.

And there are no strings attached: “All of our bulls are free agents. Farmers can use a 2900 GTPI bull to make a heifer or bull and do what they want with them.”

She’s learned some lessons in these three years. “The biggest is that genetics move really fast,” she says. “Those numbers move and they change. So it’s important for us to learn and listen for what our farmers are wanting, and to match that — to be comprehensive, competitive and smart when picking genetics, to look at genomics, scores, net merit, but also cow families and to make sure the other things are there, like daughter pregnancy rate and calving ease, and to have a good offering across the board.”

Kendra loves being around dairy cows and working with the farmers. Her passion is contagious.

“I think I’ve found my fit,” she says.

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Timeline tells the story

Consumer ‘trust-building’ (or activist placating) becomes heavy-hand on the farm

By Sherry Bunting, from Farmshine, May 10, 2019

BROWNSTOWN, Pa. — Dairy promotion has been an organized deal for over 100 years, since the formation of the National Dairy Council in 1915. It’s an understatement to say times, they are a-changing.

There’s a difference between reacting to change and being proactive to get ahead of “the next thing.” And there’s a fine line between being intuitive and proactive to influence the direction of that “next thing” as compared with charting a course that actually positions an industry to require its dairy farmers to implement x-y-and-z in order to sell milk.

Yes, it’s better to be at the table than to be the meal carved on the table by others. But when dairy producer checkoff funds — paid by all dairy producers — are used to launch products that benefit only some producers in more vertically-integrated processing structures or to launch programs that lead ultimately to requirements that determine who can sell milk, those are red flags.

As the accompanying timeline illustrates, a lot has been going on since DMI was established in 1995 to manage the checkoff and develop unified marketing plans. That was also the year the U.S. Dairy Export Council (USDEC) was created.

What is even more apparent is the proliferation of logo’d programs, initiatives and strategies put forth since the 2008 creation of the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy. This followed closely on the heels of the U.S. Supreme Court decision protecting checkoff speech as “government speech” and insulating the dairy checkoff from future court challenges in terms of the rights of producers paying the checkoff and the ability of outside organizations to challenge dairy promotion messages.

The formation of the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy brought the processing, manufacturing and other industry sectors within the inner circle of checkoff promotion, education, and ‘streamlining’ strategies. Unification of the dairy industry is a worthy goal from a marketing perspective; however, there is a fine line between streamlining and steam-rolling, and it is important to pay attention to this because these efforts are dairy-producer-checkoff-funded and should therefore benefit — and certainly not harm — all producers paying in mandatorily.

DMI’s Innovation Center is where GENYOUth was born. Under the legal non-profit name of Youth Improved Incorporated, GENYOUth aligns with USDA dietary policy.

In fact, the Innovation Center is the entity from which two Memorandums of Understanding were signed with USDA, one involving GENYOUth and the other involving the Dairy Sustainability Guidelines and Framework.

The Innovation Center is also where new products are born, like fairlife, deemed the dairy checkoff’s fluid milk “success story.” Others are following suit (like the July launch of DFA’s Live Real Farms half dairy / half almond or oat ‘milks’ aka Dairy + Almonds and Dairy + Oats).

The Innovation Center is also where producer checkoff dollars fund the National Dairy FARM program (Farmers Assuring Responsible Management) program and its three sectors by which dairies are increasingly controlled: Animal Care, Environmental Care, and Workforce Development.

While FARM is administered and managed by National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF), it is funded by DMI via dairy producer checkoff monies. According to the FARM program website, 98% of U.S. milk production is “enrolled” in FARM (via processors and cooperatives).

We are seeing evidence that the animal care portion — and in the not too distant future the sustainability and employee care portions — are being implemented with ever-increasing mandatory authority. FARM can now over-ride Veterinary Client-Patient Relationships, federal and state regulatory milk inspections and affect legal contracts to sell milk.

What started as a voluntary program to help farms improve while demonstrating to consumers the ways in which dairy farms care for animals, environment and employees, is morphing today into a mandatory auditing and probation tool with as much or more power as legal contracts and food safety inspections.

The Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy is also the entity where producer checkoff funds are used to develop Sustainability Guidelines, Frameworks and Alliances, which are leading to goals, benchmarks, and now practices. These developments are in the staging process to become mandatory as part of the increasingly “regulatory” approach of the producer-checkoff-funded FARM program.

We got a glimpse of the direction of DMI on “sustainability” in a 2018 Report by DMI CEO Tom Gallagher.

Among the “five keys to building and maintaining consumer and thought-leader trust” outlined by Gallagher in a 2018 report, global nutrition policy and sustainability ranked at the top.

On the global nutrition side, DMI seeks to “work with external groups that are educating the United Nations on what policy should look like,” Gallagher reported. He also linked the 2020 U.S. Dietary Guidelines now being evaluated by a USDA-appointed committee to being the “guidelines that will ultimately focus on how we will achieve the 2030 Sustainable Development Goals.”

He noted that Dr. Greg Miller, head of the science and research of the National Dairy Council, is involved in global discussion to “help U.S. Dairy remain a key player as dietary and sustainability standards are worked out.”

As part of this, Gallagher mentioned the Global Sustainability Framework and Reporting, developed under the Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy and now being made part of the FARM program. “A unified voice that represents the entire dairy community is essential to reinforce consumer trust. This has been core to our programs, through organizations such as the farmer-founded Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy,” said Gallagher in the 2018 DMI Report.

“As the dominant dairy community organization for the U.S. market, the Innovation Center will use the Dairy Sustainability Framework (DSF) to demonstrate global leadership in sustainable food systems,” he said. “The DSF was developed to provide overarching goals and alignment of dairy’s actions globally on the path to sustainability.”

Part of the Innovation Center’s path in this way is its partnering alliance with World Wildlife Fund (WWF) in developing the DSF.

“The DSF will enable Dairy to take an all-encompassing approach to sustainability through a common language and alignment of international activity,” said Gallagher, “and through this generate a common sustainability commitment that can be expressed at global, regional, national and organizational levels.”

These are Edelman-style techniques for building consumer trust. Edelman is the Chicago-based firm with offices worldwide, that has been working for DMI for 20 years, and increasingly over the past 10 years.

In fact, Edelman developed the Undeniably Dairy campaign, which DMI leadership has stated on record is designed to be a new seal for dairy products in the future. DMI states that the goal is to replace the REAL Seal that used to be owned by ADA / UDIA and then DMI but is now owned by NMPF.

The Innovation Center, via DMI, is also part of a relatively new initiative called Newtrient LLC, focused on sustainability, and in particular, manure management systems with a heavy emphasis on methane digesters.

According to its website www.newtrient.com, Newtrient LLC was founded in 2015 by 12 dairy cooperatives — DFA, Land O’Lakes, Maryland-Virginia, Select Milk Producers, Agri-Mark, Darigold, Prairie Farms, Michigan Milk Producers, Southeast Milk, Tillamook, United Dairymen of Arizona, and Foremost Farms. At its website, under “Dairy Leadership”, the logos of these co-ops are shown, and the explanatory paragraph states the ground-floor involvement of Dairy Checkoff and it goes this way:

“Newtrient’s founding entities include leading dairy cooperatives from across the U.S. representing nearly 20,000 dairy farmers — and producing one-half of the nation’s milk supply — as well as the two associations that advance the entire dairy industry in terms of promotion, research, education, innovation, issues management, international trade and public policy,” the statement reads. Though not named, the description of the two associations at the end of that sentence would be DMI and NMPF.

“These organizations recognize the need to bring manure management technologies and providers together with dairy farmers, researchers and other stakeholders in order to seize the opportunities from manure, while supporting environmental sustainability,” the statement reads.

In a sense, the Dairy Checkoff continues doing promotion, education and research, but is morphing with increased momentum since 2008-09 toward developing the unified voice and streamlined template by which dairy farmers will be measured for future participation in milk markets.

The Innovation Center for U.S. Dairy works like an “incubator” hatching new products, technologies, programs, guidelines, frameworks and strategies that not only unify the dairy industry message, but also streamline its participants.

With 98% of U.S. milk production enrolled in its premier programs, like FARM, the producer-funded direction is one that now possesses the increasing authority to mandate dairy farm practices, in some cases to a micromanagement level – all in the name of that beginning notion of building consumer trust.

The logos on the accompanying timeline tell this story.

Meanwhile, it appears that the idea of regionally-sustained dairy-sourcing is becoming diluted as Dairy Checkoff board decisions are weighted by shifting milk volume geographies.

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Related links

Who is empowering whom? 1/11/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1rG

Funding their own demise? 1/18/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1rW

Finances raise eyebrows 2/1/19:  https://wp.me/p329u7-1sP

4th and 40 backed up to our own endzone 2/8/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1t2

Money spent, points missed 2/8/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1sX

How did we get here 2/15/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1u3

Animal Ag in globalists’ crosshairs 2/15/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1u9

‘Government speech’ rules, producers have little say 2/22/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1uI

With science fiction, they socially herd us 3/1/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1uO

Need for more digging is obvious 3/8/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1v6

Keep zigging? or time to zag? 3/10/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1ve

Should dairy farmers be forced to fund government speech?: https://wp.me/p329u7-1ve

DMI CEO on fluid milk 3/22/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1vL

Funding real milk’s demise? 3/29/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1vU

Peeling back the layers, 4/5/19 https://wp.me/p329u7-1wn

Truth and thoughts: a tragedy government won’t accept: https://wp.me/p329u7-1wN

Farmers bring questions to DMI chair 4/19/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1×0

Childhood Nutrition Reauthorization in D.C. 4/26/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1wF

Vilsack reveals Net Zero Project 5/24/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1yf

“Government is between you and the consumer” 6/14/19: https://wp.me/p329u7-1xW

Congressman to dairy farmers: ‘Government is between you and the consumer’

Dairy Advisory Committee formed, meets with federal, state lawmakers

During a June 3 roundtable discussion between dairy stakeholders and Pennsylvania state and federal lawmakers, Nelson Troutman (right) said Pennsylvania is a fluid milk island with milk and consumers right here, but pressure pushing in from all sides. He said the state is losing its ability to compete as federal dietary rules suppress fluid milk sales while the state’s antiquated milk marketing law incentivizes more milk-swaps along the four borders as fluid milk sales decline. Clockwise from top left are U.S. Congressmen G.T. Thompson (R-15th) and Dan Meuser (R-9th), State Senator David Argall, Lolly Lesher, Mike Eby, Dale Hoffman, Tricia Adams, Nelson Troutman, Bernie Morrissey, State Senator Scott Martin, Karl Sensenig, Bonnie Wenger, Krista Byler, Craig Lutz for Sen. Argall’s office, and Katie Sattazahn. Also present were various legislative staff. Attendees shared USDA data showing that in the past 12 months, Pennsylvania lost more cows (29,000 head) and more production (66 mil. monthly pounds) than any other state in the nation, with the potential see even greater losses in the next 12 months without substantial change.

By Sherry Bunting, Farmshine, June 14, 2019

HARRISBURG, Pa. — “What I’m hearing here is that the government is between you and the consumer. You would have no problem marketing milk if you could get your message and product to the people,” said U.S. Congressman G.T. Thompson, representing Pennsylvania’s 15th legislative district over a swath of central and northcentral and northwest Pennsylvania.

That summed up the concerns related to school milk, dairy checkoff, fake milk labeling and other issues during a meeting between 11 dairy stakeholders and a dozen state and federal lawmakers and staff in Harrisburg on June 3.

It was a listening session that was followed by a productive work session as the grassroots group will continue to meet and correspond as a Dairy Advisory Committee.

(l-r) Nelson Troutman, Mike Eby, Pa. State Senator David Argall, Bernie Morrissey, Craig Lutz.

Retired agribusinessman Bernie Morrissey and 97 Milk Baleboard initiator Nelson Troutman worked with Pa. State Senator David Argall of Berks and Schuykill counties to set up the meeting.

They pulled together an advisory committee of 11 people, including Troutman and Morrissey, along with Dale Hoffman and his daughter Tricia Adams of Hoffman Farms, Potter County; Mike Eby, a Lancaster County farmer and president of National Dairy Producers Organization; Lolly Lesher of Way-Har Farms, Berks County; Katie Sattazahn of Zahncroft Farms, Womelsdorf; Krista Byler, foodservice director for Union City School District in Crawford and Erie counties, whose husband operates a crop and dairy farm in Spartansburg; Bonnie Wenger of Wen-Crest Farms, doing custom cropping and heifer raising for dairies in Lebanon and Berks counties; and Karl Sensenig of Sensenig Feed Mill, New Holland. 

I was privileged to moderate the discussion, for which an outline was provided in advance.

Congressman Thompson was joined by Congressman Dan Meuser, who represents Pennsylvania’s 9th district covering Carbon, Columbia, Lebanon, Montour and Schuykill counties along with portions of Berks, Luzerne and Northumberland.

In addition to State Senator David Argall, State Senator Scott Martin of Lancaster County attended, as ded legislative aids for Senators Ryan Aument, Elder Vogel, and Mike Folmer with additional interest from State Representatives John Lawrence and David Zimmerman.

Lawmakers said they left the discussion with “more work to do” and an “elevated awareness.” Their message to dairy farmers was: “Keep it up. Keep doing what you’re doing (a nod to the 97 Milk campaign and the planned rally for the Whole Milk for Healthy Kids Act on June 18 at the state Capitol). They said raising public awareness is crucial.

“Every few days, the bill gets another cosponsor,” said Rep. Thompson of HR 832 introduced in late January. “It will take public support and momentum to reverse this. It’s a challenging task.”

Even with evidence that bad science led to the federal school lunch milkfat restrictions, Thompson said the House Committee on Education and Labor must take up the bill in order for it to move forward. He noted that current leadership of that committee is the same as in 2010 when The Healthy Hunger Free Kids Act tightened the vice grip on milk fat. (Learn more about the school lunch changes over the past 10 to 20 years here.)

The 2010 legislation with the blessing of former Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack not only prohibited whole milk in the National School Lunch Program, it also reduced total calories, required less than 10% calories from saturated fat and made the milk part of the meal’s nutrient analysis.

With a nod to Krista Byler, Thompson said he understands more is needed beyond HR 832. “We need to eliminate the beverage information from the nutrient standards limitations,” said Thompson.

Discussion followed about the current Childhood Nutrition Reauthorization process currently underway in the Senate and what opportunities might exist for a regulatory change there.

Byler noted that while every child gets a milk, many students throw the milk away and buy sugary drinks that don’t offer milk’s nutrition.

Legislators were surprised to learn that high school students can’t buy whole milk but they can buy Mountain Dew Kickstart at school. This 80-calorie beverage made by PepsiCo — the company that also created a Smart Snacks website for school foodservice directors and received the GENYOUth Vanguard Award last November — is deemed “okay” by the current USDA Dietary Guidelines because it has fewer calories than milk, zero fat and a list of added, not natural, vitamins and minerals. But it also has 20 grams of carbohydrate, 19 grams of sugar in the form of high fructose corn syrup and zero protein, whereas whole milk has 12 grams of natural carbohydrate and 8 grams of protein.

In addition to Mountain Dew Kickstart, students in high schools and middle schools across the U.S. can buy other sweetened drinks like PepsiCo’s Gatorade as well as iced tea coolers. In addition, high schools are also permitted to have coffee bars.

Yet schools are prohibited from offering whole milk (3.25% fat) or reduced-fat (2%) with its high-quality protein and long list of natural nutrients – unless a child has a medical note from a physician.

On the flip side, schools must provide non-dairy substitutes like soy and almond beverage if a parent, not a physician, writes a note. And no notes are needed for students to throw away the milk and grab a sweetened high-carb beverage from PepsiCo.

“My purpose in coming here, after speaking with other foodservice directors across the state, is the changes that were made to allow 1% flavored milk last spring are having disheartening results. Schools have been doing the fat-free flavored milk as a requirement for so long, they don’t all understand the new rule,” Byler explained.

Part of the issue, she said, is they have their cycle menus done far in advance, and the changes to the milk — even if whole milk were suddenly allowed — do not fit into the nutrient analysis of the meal.

Before 2010, the milk was not included in the nutrient analysis of the school lunch or breakfast.

“It’s a breath of fresh air to hear members of Congress talk about this,” said Byler. “This bill (HR 832) is amazing, but it doesn’t have legs to stand on without the regulatory change to exclude milk from the nutrient analysis of the meal. For schools to have this choice, this bill needs to pass, and the milk needs to be a standalone component of the meal, otherwise schools won’t be able to make it work.”

She said the same goes for the Smart Snacks program. An exception to regulations is needed so schools can offer whole milk, just as they can offer PepsiCo’s energy drinks.

At the federal level, Rep. Thompson said the Pennsylvania Congressional delegation is working on getting a companion bill for HR 832 in the U.S. Senate. (This actually did happene a day after this report was filed for press — Senators Pat Toomey (R-Pa.) and Ron Johnson (R-Wis.) introduced the Milk In Lunch for Kids (MILK) Act this week. Bill number and text have not yet been posted)

“The biggest thing we need is to generate enough public support,” said Thompson.

The Dairy Advisory Committee urged Pa. State Senators to support a resolution on the federal bills.

On The Dairy Pride Act, Thompson was more optimistic. He believes FDA is giving an indication that the public has been misled by competing alternative beverages that infer by the name “milk” to have the nutritional attributes of milk.

Tricia Adams spoke of the many school tours she conducts at Hoffman Farms in the spring and summer, and what the kids tell them about school milk.

She says the kids are “brutally honest. They tell us, ‘This is the good milk!’ But just to get whole milk for a tour, I have to special order weeks in advance,” she says. “It’s a struggle to get enough of it at one time. It’s just not available.”

 Her father Dale Hoffman observed that farmers are so busy, it’s tough to be involved in these things. He said it is scary how fast Pennsylvania is dropping in cow numbers and production.

“Somewhere, we need to get our foot in the door. This has got to be done if Pennsylvania is going to compete. We have the milk and the consumers right here,” said Hoffman. “We need your help. We hear it’s tough to get done, but it’s time to get whole milk back in the schools.”

Mike Eby said he sold his cows three years ago, but producers selling today “are getting half of what I got.” He said the dairy situation is increasingly difficult for farm families to manage whether they are staying in, or getting out, as the value of their assets shrink along with income.

“Where is our milk going to be coming from when we all go out?” he asked.

Eby describe the power of whole milk. He has been part of an effort to give out whole milk that is standardized to 3.5% fat instead of 3.25% to meet the California standards. 

“We give the milk away at four parades a year,” he said, and the math adds up to over 10,000 individual servings. “We could give more! They love it. People are screaming for that milk.”

Circling back to Rep. Thompson’s point. The problem isn’t the product, the problem is the government getting between the farmer and the consumer when it comes to marketing the high value, nutritious and delicious product they produce.

State issues were also discussed, including needed reforms to the Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Law. Each participant also gave a fast view of the long dairy situation.

“The average dairy farmer we serve is under 150 cows, and our feed mill has 107 years in the business. We’ve seen a lot, but nothing as bad as this,” said Karl Sensenig. “We are greatly concerned about what is the future for the generations to come in our business and on the farms. We have become their bank. The situation is beyond dire, and I’m afraid we haven’t begun to see the true loss of farms. Even if the price gets a little better, many are so far gone that there’s no way out.”

Katie Sattazahn also questioned the future. She is integral to the farm operated by her husband and his brother, and she works off the farm. They upgraded their facility three years ago, never expecting a downturn of this duration and magnitude.

“The biggest thing is, we are supposed to be glad when we have a breakeven year, but that has to change. As dairy farmers, we need to be profitable to put something back into our operations,” she said. “Every dollar we spend is spent locally. Our farms provide open space and benefits for the environment, and the money we spend in our business helps the economy.”

With two young children, Sattazahn says, “If it stays the way it is, why would we encourage them to do this?”

Bonnie Wenger explained the conditions she sees in the community of dairy farmers. She explained to lawmakers the added difficulty of this year’s prevented plantings, a struggle that will get worse this fall in terms of feeding cows.

Byler also talked about the dire situation in her county. “The dairy farms support our communities. They support other businesses and bring in revenues for our school districts,” she said. “What will be left for our small rural communities?”

On the school front, she showed examples of the marketing foodservice directors see, pushing them away from animal protein. This included visuals from Fuel Up To Play 60 and its focus on fat-free and low-fat. She wonders why they can’t just talk about milk, why they have to pound home the fat-free, low-fat with every caption, every sentence, over and over. She has trouble seeing the value in it from the side of the dairy farmer or the school program.

Lawmakers and staff were taking notes, writing in the margins and circling things on the outline provided. By the end of the session, Sen. Argall said, “You’ve created a lot of work for us.”

Congressman Meuser noted this is now an even higher priority for him.

Sen. Martin said this is on the Pennsylvania Assembly’s radar, and he mentioned a package of bills coming that are “just a start.” He mentioned the dairy commission being put together to advise the legislature on dairy. 

They reminded the group to urge others to attend the rally on June 18 at 11:00 a.m. at the Capitol Rotunda in Harrisburg to support the federal dairy bills on whole milk in schools and mislabeling of non-dairy beverages. The media will be there, and this is a chance to get the public involvement that is necessary.

Here is another link to 8 ways you can help. (Swipe to read second page of this pdf).

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And the winner is: MILK!

By Sherry Bunting

INDIANAPOLIS, Ind. – It’s a roar not soon forgotten when the field of 33 drivers rounds the curve to the paddock straightaway and the pace car exits the track. The thrill of the Indianapolis 500 is unmatched in motorsports, and the refreshing, replenishing, refueling and revered beverage associated with this great race is MILK — Real Dairy Milk!

Wait for it… The patriotic blend of freedom and speed after the recognition of our military, the moment of silence and playing of Taps for fallen heroes, the Blue Angels flyover, the singing of America the Beautiful and the National Anthem, and Back Home in Indiana, the anticipated “Drivers Start Your Engines”, the breaking free of the pace cars as the field of Indy cars passes the paddock with Old Glory in tow!

For 103 years, on the Sunday of Memorial Day weekend, a patriotic display, Blue Angels fly-over, recognition of our military and moment of silence for our fallen precede the 500-mile race at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway (IMS).

And for 83 years, the legendary race is complete with the ice cold Drink of Milk in Victory Circle — deemed the “coolest trophy in sports”, awarded for the “greatest spectacle in racing,” also known as the largest single-day sporting event in the world.

Indy5294
2012 Milkman Dave Forgey (left) of River-View Dairy Farm, Logansport and his rookie Duane Hill of MayHill Farm, Fountain City.

Dave Forgey of Logansport was an Indy500 spectator for years before having the chance to be the ‘Milkman.’ As a dairy farmer he was enthusiastic when the Indiana milk promotion board began choosing dairy farmers, instead of executives, to be the ones to give the famed bottle of milk to the winning driver each year. After serving as the ‘rookie’ in 2011, he was lead Milkman in 2012.

“As dairy farmers, we bring a personal touch to the award, that brings it to the common level of the fans. At the end of the race, the Milk is always first,” said Forgey with a broad grin standing in front of the IMS Pagoda race day morning talking to fans in 2012.

The job of the Indy500 Milkmen (or women) begins long before Sunday, and continues throughout the year in venues such as Rotary Club presentations and small town parades, as well as other competitive events that capitalize on the Winners Drink Milk slogan of American Dairy Association Indiana.

By Sunday, the Milkmen are focused on keeping the Milk iced for Victory Lane and promoting milk and dairy farming to race-day fans. They ask all the drivers to choose between Whole, 2% and fat-free and have those selections ready since they don’t know who the winner will be. Whole milk has been topping the choices 2 to 1 over the past few years, and two top drivers, Ed Carpenter and James Hinchcliffe in 2019 said they would return to the buttermilk choice of 3x winner Louis Meyer in 1936, if it were an option!

In short, the Indy500 milkmen are charged with protecting the future of this unique sports award ruled tops for its “cool factor” according to Sports Illustrated writer Pete McEntegart, who in his si.com column ranked milk #1 among the Sports World’s top-10 unique trophies.

And in a recent interview, champions rate the Milk as the top tradition of this famed race that is certainly steeped in many traditions.

“It is certainly a tradition that everyone respects. What else can we do that is this national and international in scope?” Forgey observes. He said he came home to find an email from a friend in New Zealand who saw the whole thing on television.

“The fans are interested. They want to talk about our dairy farms,” says Forgey. When fans realized he was giving the bottle of mlk, they wanted to know how he qualified for the job. When Forgey explained that he and his rookie are Indiana dairy farmers, the fans were eager to know more. Of course, they also want to see the milk. Standing by the milkmen in front of the IMS Pagoda on race day morning, enthusiasm for “the milk” is evident. Fans paused to take pictures, and ask questions.

“There is always a lot of excitement for the milk among the racing fans,” says Forgey. “They know the tradition. They know about the milk. And when we can help them connect it back to the farmer, that generates interest.”

Indy500-4137
Thanks to Louis Meyer, 3-time winner who started the Winning Drink of Milk!

Initiated 83 years ago when the first three-time winner, Louis Meyer, asked for buttermilk to quench his thirst after the grueling 500-mile race, the Drink of Milk tradition has endured. Today, scientific evidence shows Louis Meyer knew what he was doing back in 1936, when he turned after that grueling race to the unique, natural and un-matched combination of hydrating re-fuel found in Real Dairy Milk with it’s healthy maitrix of fat, protein, carbohydrate, a dozen essential nutrients and refreshment. In fact, in those days, buttermilk was the name given to full-fat milk with extra heavy cream! Today’s drivers tend to choose Whole Milk (standardized at 3.25% fat) more than the reduced fat (2%) or fat-free options.

ADA Indiana coordinates the Indy500 Drink of Milk promotion today, and 45 years ago they added to the heritage by sponsoring the “Fastest Rookie” award on the Tuesday before the big race. The coveted award recognizes the first-year driver who achieves the fastest four-lap average speed from among fellow rookie competitors during time trials.

“The rookies are very interested in the milk and getting their pictures taken with the milk,” says Forgey.

Fast forward to 2016 with the 100th running of the Indy500 and what a celebration it was! Nearly half a million people attended in person. To put this into perspective, the largest-ever attendance of the NFL Superbowl was just over 100,000 people. The 100th running of the Indy500 in 2016 clocked in at 350,000 in the gates and another estimated 100,000 outside the gates just wanting to “be there.”

Prairie Farms, American Dairy Association Indiana and the IMS together gave commemorative, specially-packaged bottles of milk to fans for a winning milk toast and they were available in stores throughout the region.

After 500 miles, 200 laps, 54 lead changes and 13 different leaders, the winning of the 100th Indy500 came down to a fuel strategy that put Alexander Rossi — the 9th rookie ever, and the first since 2001 — into Victory Lane at the Indianapolis Motor Speedway for the sweet taste of victory — the 80th traditional ice cold drink of milk, delivered in 2016 by Milkwoman Janet Dague, a dairy farmer from Kewana, Indiana and rookie Joe Kelsay of Kelsay Farms, Whiteland.

“I was so excited to see our rookie win the 500,” said Dague, an avid race fan and dairy farmer after delivering the Drink of Milk to Rossi in Victory Circle. “I was jumping up and down, cheering when he crossed the finish line. I even said to Joe ‘I told you I wanted our rookie to win!’

By “our rookie,” Dague was referring to Rossi earning the 42nd Fastest Rookie award given annually by the ADA-Indiana at a special dairy-and-racing-focused luncheon on the Tuesday before the race. There, Rossi was honored as the qualifying rookie with the fastest 4-lap average speed on qualification day, at an average 228 mph.

Dague described Rossi as “so gracious about winning. I think because of the rookie luncheon that just took place, he understood how important this was for the ADA-Indiana and every other dairy farmer around the world,” she explained. “In every picture, he made sure to take a drink of the milk and even made sure our logo was facing front and center. We couldn’t ask for a better spokesperson.”

The whole crew was celebrating that win with their milk, along with race fans given commemorative bottles on the 100th anniversary. Owners Michael Andretti and Bryan Herta were toasting each other, drinking their milk. Andretti, in particular, was happy to taste the elusive beverage right from driver Rossi’s official bottle while Rossi did his victory interview with ESPN, and their chief mechanic was next for the taste of victory!

Rookie Milkman Kelsay was excited to be there for the first time with the Drink of Milk in that 100th year of the Indy500.

“To have the spotlight shine on the nutrition of milk in this way is just awesome,” he said during the parade honoring military and the heritage of the race on the day before. “It is an honor to represent fellow dairy farmers who are back home milking and feeding and listening to the race on the radio. It has been a humbling experience so far. It seems as important to the fans as it is to dairy farmers. Even one of the police officers mentioned what an honor it was to meet us, saying he would be sure to keep me safe if something happens.

“We just thank Louis Meyer for starting this trend over 80 years ago that we can highlight the healthy choice of milk and deliver that message to a global audience here at the Indy500,” Kelsay adds.

“What better way could we as dairy farmers promote our product than to be out in the forefront of this event, which is so significant worldwide?” says Forgey, who appreciated the honor of spending 2011 and 2012 representing the dairy farmers in Indiana and across the U.S., who work hard to produce a healthy product.

After all, #WinnersDrinkMilk because #RealMilkAlwaysWins #TasteTheVictory

2018 winner: Milk!
Hubs and I at the 100th Indy500 in 2016 in the paddock straightaway. He has followed the race his entire life. I was drawn in when we met in 1978 and was happy we could cover the 100th Anniversary run for Farmshine as farm media in 2016!

The horrors of hormones? Truth is, we can’t live (or eat) without them.

These Jersey cows are healthy high producing cows. They lie on deep bedded sand and congregate with their own social herd pecking order. Of all the cattle breeds, Jerseys seem to be the most curious.  Photo by Sherry Bunting

By Sherry Bunting

A while back, I tackled the subject of food labeling in a consumer column. We covered the rigorous testing by which ALL milk is actually antibiotic free. But people still had questions. They kept hearing about hormones in milk and meat, and they see labels stating “hormone free” and wonder what to make of it all.

So we’ll turn our attention to the hormone question and the labels we see.

The biology news flash of the day is that there are hormones in pretty much everything we eat — that is, if it was derived from a living organism.

And yes, that goes for the plant-derived foods we consume also!

In fact, endocrinologists and reproductive physiologists explain hormones as small chemicals that are produced naturally by and circulate throughout all living things! These hormones instruct cells and tissues on how to adjust, grow, reproduce and thrive.

Without hormones, life could not exist. All foods come from living things — both plant and animal. Technically, all life requires hormones. Thus, all living things, plants and animals, contain hormones.

So, if someone tries to sell you ‘hormone-free’ products, and you know it did not come from a rock, well, technically, it can’t be ‘hormone-free’.

In the hormone conversation, the most important thing that is missing these days is perspective and context!

Jude Capper, a livestock sustainability consultant and former university professor, explains it this way:

“The amount of estrogen in the steak from the implanted animal is miniscule: 5.1 nanograms. One nanogram (one-billionth of a gram or one-25-billionth of an ounce) is roughly equivalent to one blade of grass on a football field. By contrast, one birth-control pill, taken daily by over 100 million women worldwide, contains 35,000 nanograms of estrogen. That’s the equivalent of eating 3,431 pounds of beef from a hormone-implanted animal every single day. To put it another way, it’s the annual beef consumption of 59 adults. Doesn’t that put it into perspective?”

To repeat: One birth control pill contains the hormone equivalent to the amount of beef eaten by 59 adults in one year. So one month of birth control is equivalent to the amount of beef 59 adults would eat in 30 years.

Perspective.

Here’s another comparison from Dr. Troy Ott, a professor of reproductive physiology at Penn State:

“If you set the amount of estrogenic activity in a 3 oz steak equal to one M&M candy, then 3 oz of tofu (made from soy plants) would contain a tractor-trailer full of M&M – that’s 19 million times more. Big difference! But fear not, eat your tofu because your liver is there to deal with any substances that enter your body from the food you eat.”

Whew! Whether you are a vegetarian, carnivore or omnivore, it’s good to know the hormone food topic is not so scary after all.

Hormones are the beneficial agents of life on the planet Earth. They regulate every process of life. When we consume plant and animal foods, we are consuming hormones that our bodies recognize as nutrients!

Perhaps the confusion about hormones stems from all of the talk in sports these days about steroid use. That’s a much different conversation. The hormones in plants and animals – that we consume – are first of all digested and secondly recognized by our human bodies as nutrients, not steroids.

Trent Loos, a seventh generation rancher, explains it this way: “Misinformation and misunderstanding of the value of hormones to our everyday life have perpetuated the concern over hormones. Some of that has certainly been the result of activists and those attempting to remove technology and efficiency from the food production system. However, some also has been the result of misleading messages…” in the area of marketing.”

He cites researchers from Lafayette College, who have shown how hormones regularly improve our lives. Many common foods naturally contain estrogen (or in the case of plants, phytoestrogen) at levels hundreds or thousands of times higher than the levels in any dairy or meat product to come from animals — even those animals that may have been given additional hormone to more efficiently produce food at a more affordable price for a growing world.

In fact, if you tested milk from rbST-treated cows versus cows that did not receive rbST (recombinant bovine somatotropin) you would find no difference in the milk. Likewise for beef that comes from a steer (neutered male) that received hormone replacement at a specific time in its growth and the appropriate withdrawal time observed before harvest. The beef from that hormone-implanted steer would test pretty close to the natural hormone levels in the beef from an untreated, non-pregnant female beef animal.

As we read labels and marketing materials about the food we feed our families, here is a checklist to consider:

— Context is everything, so keep a perspective about this topic and the various label claims when determining how to spend your food dollar.

— The hormones being debated (either at naturally-occurring or at enhanced levels for production efficiency) are protein hormones, not steroid hormones.

— Our bodies do not recognize these protein hormones as hormones, but rather as nutrients! It’s pretty cool to think about how wonderfully we are made.

— Hormones are found in every living thing – be it plant or animal! In other words – food!

— There is no difference in the hormone content of milk whether or not the cows received hormone treatments for enhanced productivity at any point in their life. But that said, most dairy farms have given up this practice for many years because of consumer confusion. Most milk in stores is produced from cows not treated with rBST or rbGH and is labeled this way as well.

— In the long run, animal productivity benefits consumers by helping to keep food costs more affordable than they would otherwise be. Food prices are rising but the farmer’s portion of the consumer dollar is at an all-time low of 14 cents today.

While some want to debate hormone-free meat and milk and create fear in the minds of consumers, the truth is that we encounter far higher levels in plant foods, which we readily consume without question.

Here is a short-list showing just some of the eye-opening example comparisons compiled by the researchers at Lafayette College. (ng = nanogram)

  • 4 ounces of beef from untreated steer: 1.2 ng of estrogen
  • 4 ounces of beef from non-pregnant heifer: 1.5 ng of estrogen
  • 4 ounces of beef from steer given hormones: 1.6 ng of estrogen
  • 3 ounces of milk from cow given recombinant bovine somatotropin (rbST): 11 ng of estrogen
  • 3 ounces of milk from non-rbST-treated cow: 11 ng of estrogen
  • 4 ounces of raw peas: 454 ng of estrogen
  • 4 ounces of raw cabbage: 2,700 ng of estrogen
  • Average soy latte (one cup of soy milk): 30,000 ng of estrogen
  • 3.5 ounces of soy protein concentrate: 102,000 ng of estrogen
  • 3 ounces of soybean oil: 168,000 ng of estrogen
  • Average level in a woman of childbearing age: 480,000 ng of estrogen per day
  • Average level in a pre-pubertal girl: 54,000 ng of estrogen per day

A former newspaper editor, Sherry Bunting has been writing about dairy, livestock and crop production for over 35 years. Before that, she milked cows. She can be reached at agrite2011@gmail.com

Farmers bring questions to DMI chair

By Sherry Bunting, Farmshine, April 19, 2019

GORDONVILLE, Pa. — “You are hearing the negatives, not the positives,” said Marilyn Hershey about the dairy checkoff during a meeting requested by Lancaster County dairy farmers hosted here in Gordonville on Friday, April 12.

Hershey has a dairy farm with her husband Duane in neighboring Chester County, and she serves as the national chairperson of the Dairy Management Inc. (DMI) board.

Approximately 12 of the expected 30 farmers attended the meeting with a range of topics on their minds, in particular fluid milk sales and whole milk promotion.

Hershey got involved in dairy promotion eight years ago, serving first on the National Dairy Board, then becoming vice chair of DMI, the board that combines various boards, before becoming chairperson two years ago. National Dairy Board has term limits, whereas the DMI board does not.

Accompanying Hershey for the discussion was Harold Shaulis of Somerset County, who served 25 years on state, regional and national checkoff boards. Having sold his cows, he is no longer a board member, but helps with promotion.


After a Q&A session with farmers, DMI chairperson Marilyn Hershey supplied this graphic of how dairy consumption has increased while product share has changed from 1985 through 2018. The chart represents National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF) analysis of USDA commercial disappearance. According to USDA, the agency’s commercial disappearance figures include imports and most exports.

Shaulis said the bottom line in dairy promotion is to sell more milk. He said total per-capita dairy consumption has grown since the 1980s, even though fluid milk sales have declined (Fig. 1). He also talked about trade missions to China and Southeast Asia.

“We are in a global market. One out of six loads of milk a day is exported, and we want to see that grow,” he said.

In addition to exports, Hershey said consumers are eating more dairy products, overall. “The National Dairy Council has funded 20 years of research on butter to get it back in the mainstream. We got butter into McDonalds in place of margarine, and 80% of McDonalds’ sales have a dairy ingredient in them,” she explained as an example of DMI’s partnership strategy.

By email, after the meeting, Hershey furnished the previously requested list of National Dairy Council research we will explore for a future edition.

However, a perusal of the science summaries section of National Dairy Council’s own website, where a few summaries are available, each download is prefaced with these words: “Low-fat and fat-free dairy foods are part of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) and American Heart Association (AHA) dietary recommendations. You can download our full report, which shows further support for consuming low-fat or fat-free dairy foods as recommended in the 2015 DGA.”

The website also talks about “nourishing communities,” about farm animal care and sustainability measures (FARM program) adopted and funded by checkoff dollars that tie in with the low-fat and fat-free dietary theme.


This screenshot of the landing page for the Undeniably Dairy campaign’s website (https://www.discoverundeniablydairy.com/) illustrates the nourishing communities theme that DMI chair Marilyn Hershey says targets “conflicted health seekers.” She also said: “We want Undeniably Dairy to replace the Real Seal. That is the goal.”

Undeniably Dairy replaces Real Seal

Cross-referenced to the National Dairy Council website is the Undeniably Dairy campaign. Hershey said this promotes positive messages to targeted audiences with school curriculum and through social media.

At this website, the “nourishing communities” theme continues as well as the reinforcement of low-fat and fat-free dairy.

Hershey provided a handout on Undeniably Dairy and said: “We are targeting the ‘conflicted health seeker’ with four messages: Responsibly produced, nutrient rich, locally driven, real enjoyment.”

More interesting is where DMI wants to take the campaign.

“We want Undeniably Dairy to replace the Real Seal. That is the goal,” said Hershey. “We are combining MilkPEP’s ‘Love What’s Real’ campaign with our Undeniably Dairy campaign.” 

The Real Seal was previously owned by UDIA / DMI, but it is now the property of National Milk Producers Federation (NMPF). The Real Seal can only be used on milk and dairy products that contain real dairy ingredients, no imitation dairy ingredients and are made with milk produced and processed in the USA.

This posed a problem for DMI, since importers must pay a small checkoff fee for dairy promotion, so the dairy checkoff stopped promoting the Real Seal and came up with Undeniably Dairy two years ago.

Hershey fielded questions about the requirements for using the Undeniably Dairy Seal. How might those requirements differ from the Real Seal? She did not have the specifics and promised to get back with those details.

In the schools

Fielding questions on the school breakfast carts, Hershey explained that GENYOUth is the umbrella organization, and Fuel Up to Play 60 (FUTP60) is the boots on the ground.

“We don’t just have a foot in the schools, we are IN the schools,” said Hershey. “Companies would love to have what we have in the schools.”

The Northeast program is strong because there are seven football teams here so the program can affect a large number of kids in the Northeast, according to Hershey.

Asked what is on the breakfast carts, she said: “Yogurt, cheese, milk, fruits and vegetables, and some have smoothie machines.”

She said the Grab N Go Breakfast Carts have ice packs to keep the milk cold. She also stated that every dime ADA Northeast sends in to GENYOUth is returned to the Northeast region to fund FUTP60 and breakfast carts as well as other foodservice equipment grants to schools. (See ADA Northeast 2017 Annual Report here)

Hershey confirmed that the GENYOUth Gala raises more money than it spends by getting funds from other donors to buy more carts. She explained, as previously reported in Farmshine, that PepsiCo gave $1 million to translate FUTP60 into Spanish and pay for more breakfast carts. She said PepsiCo made a large 2018 commitment to the program, and that’s why PepsiCo recognized with the Vanguard Award at the 2018 Gala.

“We buy the carts, and we have multi-year contracts with the schools to keep milk on the carts,” said Hershey.

Acknowledging that the milk provided is fat-free or 1%, she stressed that, “As independent dairy producers, we can advocate for whole milk, but DMI, FUTP60, and GENYOUth cannot influence policy,” she explained.

“You have to go to your co-ops and Farm Bureau and G.T. Thompson to get that done. We can’t do it,” said Shaulis.

What we can do is put out our research and promote research,” said Hershey.

Shalis said the FUTP60 breakfast carts “absolutely sell more milk.”

He reported that 95,000 more children participated in school breakfast in 2018 compared with 2017. “That’s 95,000 more servings of milk since they have to take a milk.”

“But do they like it?” asked one farmer.

Hershey quickly replied: “It doesn’t matter if it’s 3%, 1%, 2% or 0%, they are getting the same nutrition. Even though they are not getting the fat content, they are getting the nutrients.”

A discussion of fat-soluble nutrients and bioavailability of nutrients ensued.

When asked if DMI, yes or no, believes 1% and fat-free milk are equal to whole milk, Hershey said: “We have no control over what we serve or promote in the schools. With that carton of 1% milk, we want children to know they are getting the nutrition, we can’t address the fat.”

When asked what DMI can do about 20-plus years of having the low-fat diet-heart hypothesis “forced on us,” Hershey’s reply was that, “It took 20 years to get here and it will take a while to turn it around.”

She informed the group that the American Heart Association has already written a letter to Congress signed by 18 health organizations protesting the House Bill 832: Whole Milk for Healthy Kids Act.

“They are against the bill, so there is a battle in front of us,” Hershey said.

On the positive side, Hershey said farmers can thank Dr. Greg Miller, global chief science officer for the National Dairy Council, for his use of the research on full-fat dairy. She also said dairy farmers can thank the dairy scientists in each partnering company’s kitchen as DMI develops new products for Pizza Hut, Taco Bell, Domino’s and McDonalds.

Beyond the fat

“Lots of things with school milk need changing, not just the fat,” said Hershey as she dove into the innovations side of DMI’s strategy.

“I appreciate that the fat content is your focus, but it has to be the right temperature, delivered correctly and packaged correctly,” she said. “We are working on this with processors.”

She said that giving high school teens the same packaging as kindergarteners doesn’t fly. She cited research showing that when schools switched from paper cartons to plastic bottles, milk sales grew by double-digits in the first year, and waste was down by 20% in those schools.

“Kids want to drink their milk from a bottle because that’s how they drink everything else,” said Hershey, noting that Rick Naczi, executive director of ADA Northeast, pointed this out at a fluid milk meeting DMI had in Chicago in February.

“School milk got a lot of discussion there,” Hershey reported. “But, let’s not get lost in this whole milk point. There is a huge price difference (between whole milk and 1% or fat-free), and school contracts are lost by one-quarter of a penny per carton.”

Some of the farmers in attendance said that didn’t matter unless other beverages can compete for those contracts. The bottom line would be whole milk going into the schools.

Time was also spent talking about the trend toward smaller containers and ultra-high temperature (UHT) pasteurization. “All the milk in Europe is UHT, and it tastes good,” said Shaulis.

Some of the farmers in the room disagreed, sharing their concerns that UHT leaves a less valuable product nutritionally and in flavor. To which, Hershey and Shaulis said the entire food industry is going that way, and there’s nothing they can do about that.

“What we have to try to do (in promotion) is stand by the value milk has and promote what we are able to promote,” said Hershey.

She shared figures showing that overall fluid milk sales represent 18% of total milk production: “79% of consumers are not eating meals as a family. Everything is grab and go. That’s where we need to be,” said Hershey. “We have to meet consumers where they are with our innovation and packaging.”

Citing fairlife, she explained how “that product came through our fluid milk committee, and now others are following. Darigold has a new high protein ‘fitness’ drink. DFA has a couple things coming out under the Live Real Farms label. Kroger and Shamrock are coming out with beverages – all this year. These products have a lot of milk in them,” she said.

Farmers learned that these new products are not Class I products. They are largely Class II.

“We partner on these products,” said Hershey. “We give money for research. They do the product research. We only contribute to the research to try and get the innovation out there in order to survive.”

“We gave up on selling milk. ‘Got Milk’ did nothing,” Shaulis added. “Generic milk advertising doesn’t work.”

Farmers wanted more statistics to back up this claim, and they referenced the overwhelming reaction among consumers to the 97 Milk Baleboards and campaign done voluntarily at a grassroots level, starting in Lebanon County, Pennsylvania with signs and baleboards now in five states and spreading nationwide and internationally through the website and social media.

Hershey did share the news that retail data show whole milk sales grew more in the first quarter of 2019 than the already higher whole milk sales in 2018.

She later sent an email stating that in the Northeast, retail sales data show 40% of fluid milk sales are coming from whole milk sales. She also reported that, nationally, whole milk sales as a percentage of total fluid milk sales rose from 29.7% in 2014 to 39.3% currently.

As one farmer noted, “DMI has done a good job promoting cheese, what we are asking for is more focus on fluid whole milk than we are seeing now.”

Farmers were concerned that if they continue to be forced to pay into a checkoff program that represents their market less and less, what does the future hold for them?

Hershey had explained that the national checkoff boards are represented geographically by milk volume.

Some wondered if making the checkoff voluntary would allow them to put money into promoting local whole milk, and to take on the imitations head-to-head without the restrictive oversight of USDA.

“It’s all or nothing. That’s how the whole world of checkoff programs work,” said Shaulis. “These farmers on the board look at every penny spent, and they look at what is best for the industry while regions look at what is best for their region.”

To be continued.


DMI chairperson Marilyn Hershey and former board member Harold Shaulis met with dairy farmers for a question-and-answer session in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania on Friday, April 12. Hershey explained that DMI, the board she chairs, combines the National Dairy Board and the UDIA board. In this way, DMI brings together the national 5-cent spending with the portion of the 10 regional cents that is brought into national efforts under the unified marketing plan.